Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Cell Phones Banned on CAP Aircraft
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
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Photo Caption:
Samsung Galaxy S7 before meltdown, left, and its charred shell, right, after. (Photo: The Sun)


By Lt. Col. Robert Sims, Southeast Region
Maxwell AFB, Ala.--In an unprecedented decision by the national leadership team, the Civil Air Patrol has followed the actions of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to ban the "possession of a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 while flying in a CAP aircraft". The move to protect everyone involved was announced on Tuesday, October 18th and is to take effect immediately.

As in the case of the FAA, the Civil Air Patrol has deemed these phones hazardous cargo whether turned on or off according to a memorandum sent to all members by the Director of Operations, John W. Desmarais, Sr. from National Headquarters at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. In light of the classification of phone as "hazardous material", Mr. Desmarais stated that this is a good opportunity review general aviation regulations concerning the transportation of hazardous materials (49 CFR Part 175).

 
 Memorandum from National Headquarters

Dear [Member]

The Department of Transportation took steps late last week to ban all Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones from all commercial aviation operations. If you have not read the DOTís press release, please do. After consultation with our leadership team and the National Commander, CAP is taking the prudent step of not allowing these phones on board CAP Aircraft from this point forward. 

Please consider these phones hazardous cargo whether turned on or off. 

Remind crewmembers to make passengers aware prior to boarding CAP aircraft that hazardous cargo like these phones is not allowed on board, and give them the opportunity to place it somewhere safe prior to flight, but it cannot be brought on board even if powered down. 

If any crewmember sees a passenger is in possession of a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 while flying in a CAP aircraft, they are expected to instruct the passenger to power off the device, not use or charge the device while aboard the aircraft, protect the device from accidental activation, including disabling any features that may turn on the device like alarm clocks, and keep the device on their person, not in seat back pockets, nor in any carry-on baggage, for the duration of the sortie. 

Please make this an emphasis item for all personnel within your areas of responsibility as well though since some may not see it. 

This is also a good time to review what can and cannot be brought on board general aviation aircraft in general. The regulation concerning transportation of hazardous materials aboard aircraft can be found in 49 CFR Part 175. AOPA also has a very informative webpage that discusses this topic at: https://www.aopa.org/training-and-safety/active-pilots/safety-and-technique/operations/transportation-of-hazardous-materials. Flying units especially are encouraged to review this topic as one of their next safety briefings. 

Thanks for your attention to this matter. 

John W. Desmarais, Sr. 
HQ CAP Director of Operations
Article Information
Reviewed by: Lt. Col. Robert Sims
Syndicated to: Region Hq, Alabama Wing, Florida Wing, Georgia Wing, Mississippi Wing, Tennessee Wing, Puerto Rico Wing
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Civil Air Patrol, the longtime all-volunteer U.S. Air Force auxiliary, is the newest member of the Air Forceís Total Force, which consists of regular Air Force, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve, along with Air Force retired military and civilian employees. CAP, in its Total Force role, operates a fleet of 550 aircraft and performs about 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually. Civil Air Patrolís 56,000 members nationwide also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Its members additionally play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. Performing missions for America for the past 75 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.
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