Two Florida Squadrons Work Together to Help Cadets Soar
Filed under Region Hq, Florida Wing, Cadet Programs, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3, Group 4, Group 5, Group 6, Group 7, Group 800, Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters, Florida Feature on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 by Author: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll.

On 18 March 2017, four cadets from the Venice Cadet Squadron, joined by their Deputy Commander, Lt. Col. Rita Cucchiara, joined cadets and senior members from the SRQ Composite Squadron for a day of Cadet Orientation Flights.

“Our relationship with the SRQ Composite Squadron is extremely helpful,” Cucciara said. “We have a smaller cadet squadron and it’s good for our cadets to have the opportunity to interact with other cadets and share experiences.”  She noted the relationship allows cadets from both squadrons to gain insights and work to expand team-building skills.

In addition to orientation flights, the two squadrons have worked closely on first aid training, a winter bivouac, and Wreaths Across America.

Saturday’s flight held particular significance for an SRQ Composite Squadron cadet. Cadet Melissa Nepomuseno-grez, who has been a CAP member for only a month, had her very first airplane flight on Saturday. The eighth grader from Sarasota Middle School, who thinks she might like to pursue an aviation career, said she joined CAP so she could have more activities outside of home and school.

The Cadet Orientation Flight Program, through a series of five flights, introduces cadets to the use of flight controls; how the effects of lift, drag and gravity affect an airplane; how to perform basic flight maneuvers; how to maintain a safe flying environment; and how weather impacts flight. Best of all, cadets get to take the controls and actually fly the airplane. Senior member pilots in the squadron receive training to help them share their knowledge with cadets.

Upon return from her flight, Nepomuseno-grez said, “It was amazing! I want to do it again. Everything seems so small up there.”

CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).

Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron includes 98 members: 60 senior members and 38 cadets. Members put general aviation to its best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit http://fl044.flwg.us.

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SRQ Composite Squadron pilot Maj. Benjamin Moore (right) guides Venice Cadet Aidan Freihaut (left) through the preflight inspection prior to a Cadet Orientation Flight. (Photo Credit: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, CAP)



Naples Cadets Provide Community Service at Lorenzo Walker Air Show
Filed under Region Hq, Florida Wing, Cadet Programs, Group 5 on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 by Author: Maj. Marian Motyl-Szary.

The Lorenzo Walker Car and Air Show came to Naples on 4 February 2017. Held annually at the Naples Municipal Airport, it has antique and muscle cars in addition to local aircraft on display. A special attraction this year was the three unique aircraft: a P51, B17, and B25 brought to the show by the Collings Foundation.

Two Civil Air Patrol cadets from the Naples squadron C/A1C Cendall Gonzales and C/SSgt Collin Duke Early greeted the early morning arrivers at the gate to the show. An additional eight cadets, their parents and senior CAP members provided important logistical support to the air show.

Naples Cadet Squadron Commander, Major Kevin Dinger, monitored the cadet activity with the assistance of staff members 1st Lt. Donald Binner and 2nd Lt. Tom Ryan. The squadron’s newly purchased hand-held radios helped to keep everyone coordinated as events changed throughout the day.



The first order of business was a FOD walk. The cadets assembled at the ramp where the WWII bombers were displayed. They formed in a line to sweep the ramp of any foreign objects or debris that could be launched by the starting of the bombers powerful engines. The cadets assisted airport security personnel to move spectators to a safe viewing area. The cadets then formed and held a security line at the north edge of the area to keep people from wandering into the area when the giant propellers began to turn as the B17’s and then the B25’s engines started.

One by one the engines coughed, the propellers turned and finally roared to life. The aircrews completed the pre-flight and engine start procedures. The B17 revved up its four 1200hp engines and slowly turned toward the taxiway for takeoff. The B25 followed, the roar from its four 1700hp engines was nearly deafening. The historic aircraft taxied out, holding short of the main runway. One after the other, the four-engine bombers pulled onto the main runway, accelerated to rotation speed and lifted gracefully into the blue morning sky.

The cadets smiled and pointed, looking on in appreciation, as each bomber roared past them and the spectators on their first morning sortie. The cadets would be called again later in the day to help secure the bomber ramp for other sorties.

 

The cadets also provided support to U.S. Customs located on the airport to help direct ground traffic in the ramp area to maintain safe operations area for inbound aircraft. Officer Muenchausen, from the Naples Customs and Border Protection, has requested assistance from the CAP squadron for previous events.

Muenchausen requested the cadets to assemble at his office for a briefing. Only two members in the group had previous experience with this duty so a quick review ensured that each person was clear on his or her duties.

> C/1st Sgt McIntire used his hand-held radio to alert the team to the first plane’s arrival. The cadets quickly took up their assigned position and cordoned off an area for the aircraft to park. Once the plane departed, the cadets resumed other duties. The cadets returned and repeated these actions for several more aircraft during the day.

In appreciation for the day of volunteer service, the Collins Foundation graciously allowed all of the CAP members a chance climb aboard the bombers for an up-close tour of these magnificent flying machines.

The air show is one of many community service projects the CAP cadets participate in each year. Citizens serving communities is more than a slogan to Naples cadets, it is a core value which drive their duty.





CAP Glider Orientation Flights (February 25, 2017)
Filed under Group 1 on Sunday, March 12, 2017 by Author: 1st Lt. Chuck McCollim.

It was a perfect day for flying for the cadets from FL-425 and seven sorties were completed at the Elsanor Gliderport (1AL4) in Robertsdale, Ala. The day started with pilots 2d Lt. Emmett Moran and 2d Lt. Rustin Howard giving a very thorough explanation on the operation of the glider. Each cadet was then given the opportunity to actually handle the controls and fly the glider after reaching a release altitude of 2500 feet. Cadets C/A1C Nicholas Fijalkowski, C/Amn Michelle Stin, and George Semple all had their very first glider flight and also completed one additional flight. Cadet C/CMSgt Micah Barr completed his fifth and final glider flight. In addition to glider pilots 2d Lt. Rustin Howard and 2d Lt. Emmett Moran, the cadets were supported by an additional eight senior members: squadron commander 1st Lt. Cecilia Rogers, SM Randall Rogers, Capt. Larry Jones, Capt. Robert Dorsey, 1st Lt. Charles McCollim, and three members of the Coastal Soaring Association who served as glider tow pilot, and ground assistants.

Thank you to all who supported this great glider mission, especially the Coastal Soaring Society who also provided hamburgers and hot dogs for lunch.

For more photos and video, please go to www.facebook.com/EmeraldCoastSeniorSquadron/


SRQ Composite Squadron Cadets Take Aerospace Education to New Heights
Filed under Region Hq, Florida Wing, Cadet Programs, Group 5, Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters on Wednesday, March 8, 2017 by Author: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll.

On 25 February 2017, the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) hosted a model rocketry day to help cadets work toward, and in some cases complete, their rocketry badges, a part of the Aerospace Education program.

At the end of the day, Cadet Melissa Nepomuseno-grez said, "I learned how to officially launch a rocket and how to prepare the engine." She added that she took away some important safety lessons.

The day began with model rocket construction at the Lee Wetherington Boys and Girls Club of Sarasota County. Model-rocketry skill sets ranged from Phase 1, fizzy rockets, to more advanced multi-stage rockets. Once complete, the cadets added their own artistic flares and personal touches with spray paint, from jet black and dazzling blues, all the way to bright neon orange.

Following lunch, the cadets headed to Sarasota Military Academy Prep in Sarasota with their rockets for launching. C/1st Lt. Austin Vore's rocket traveled out of sight, crossing a field and lake. The nose section of C/A1C Caeden Moore's rocket found its way into a nearby lake. After several tries, Cadet Nepomuseno-grez made the recovery from the lake. In spite of a strong wind, cadets recovered all of their rockets.

After several launches and lots of wadding paper (a key ingredient in making for a successful rocket recovery), the cadets called it a day and headed back to the Boys and Girls Club.

CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).

Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron includes 96 members: 60 senior members and 36 cadets. Members put general aviation to its best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit http://fl044.flwg.us.


Cadet Melissa Nepomuseno-gre developes her rocket-building skills. (Photo Credit: Cadet Brynne-lei Radcliffe, CAP)


"And we have lift-off!" C/SSgt. David Colon's rocket blasts off. (Photo Credit: Cadet Brynne-lei Radcliffe, CAP)

Marco Island Receives Brand New Cessna Airplane - C182/G1000
Filed under Region Hq, Florida Wing, Group 5 on Friday, March 3, 2017 by Author: Maj. Marian Motyl-Szary.

Facts: 
CAP has a fleet of over 500 airplanes
CAP is the largest single-engine aircraft customer for Cessna
CAP on average purchases 20 - 25 aircraft per year. 
In 2017, two new airplanes were assigned to the Florida Wing and one was assigned to the Marco Island Senior Squadron.


With its sophisticated computerized cockpit, this brand-new plane will enable us to perform more precise, safer, more accurate, and faster Search and Rescue, and Disaster-related missions. "It provides for more safety of flight with on-board weather and traffic avoidance systems and a latest generation autopilot. It improves the aircrew's awareness of the in-flight situation and reduces the workload. " – said Flight Operations Officer, Major Richard Farmer.

The aircraft is equipped with a Garmin G1000 "glass cockpit" installation, which contains two LCD displays (one acting as the primary flight display and the other as the multi-function display) as well as an integrated communications panel that fits between the two. The primary flight display shows the basic flight instruments, such as the airspeed indicator, the altimeter, the heading indicator, and course deviation indicator. 

The multi-function display typically shows a moving map on the right side, and engine instrumentation on the left.


Marco Island’s geographic location is adjacent to the wilderness areas of the Everglades, and the Ten Thousand Islands, which are heavily used by kayaks, canoes, and small boats. For this reason, our Squadron performs weekly Coastal Patrols of this area. Our purpose is to keep these boaters and campsite users safe. Beyond members’ funds and volunteer hours, the Marco Squadron relies on community donations to meet essential annual operating expenses.    Your Marco Island CAP Squadron is involved in Search & Rescue, Disaster Relief, Cadet and Aerospace programs and is aligned with Homeland Security performing twice-monthly flight operations missions. Our squadron participated in the photoreconnaissance mission in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew. We were the first air sortie dispatched to take pictures of the affected coastline. In total CAP flew for four days, utilizing over one hundred aircrews and took over seventeen thousand pictures for FEMA and the Florida Emergency Management department.



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